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    The Parklands Receives $3 Million Grant for Ecosystem Conservation
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    The major grant, from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, is in support of 21st Century Parks’ urban conservation plans for The Parklands of Floyds Fork.

    Over the next 12 to 18 months, The Parklands will use the money to complete a number of projects:

    • Plant more than 32,000 native trees in Beckley Creek, Broad Run and Turkey Run parks.
    • Develop a world-class, 15-acre Woodland Garden in Broad Run Park designed by Rick Darke to showcase an abundance of native trees including dogwood, redbud, viburnum and giant oaks.
    • Install approximately 80 acres of native meadows and prairie.
    • Create a Watchable Wildlife Program that integrates the park user experience with native wildlife through site enhancements, signage and educational programming.
    • Remove invasive plant species that are damaging native flora that local wildlife depends on for survival.
    • Expand stream-side corridors along Floyds Fork.
    • Implement a habitat conservation initiative for the endangered Kentucky Glade Cress plant community native only to Jefferson County.

    The restored ecosystems that the grant will enable will also enhance habitat, migration, food sources and water sources for native wildlife; including raptors, turkeys, river otters, quail, mink and butterflies. This map shows the planned enhancements throughout the entire Parklands, from Beckley Creek Park to Broad Run Park.

    Partner Eco-Tech Consultants of Louisville will assist in assessments and ecosystem analysis and plans to add five or more employees and contract with many specialists to complete the grant projects.

    Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said in a statement, “The Parklands initiative has been world-class and exceptional in every aspect and this urban conservation partnership with the Helmsley Trust is the latest example. It helps define Louisville as an innovative and progressive 21st century city, which in turn helps us retain and attract top talent, businesses and jobs.”

    Photo: The Parklands of Floyds Fork

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    About Kachina Shaw

    A transplanted Hawkeye, I've now lived in Louisville longer than any other city. Can't live without: my husband and fur babies, coal-black coffee, peanut M&Ms, sunflowers, monthly vacations, books, walking paths, massage and a big purse.

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